interesting-questions

Friday was my last day at the Spa Bar in Selfridges, where I have been for the past 5 weeks giving free consultations and nutrition advice. It has been a fantastic experience and so great to have met some of you – a big thank you to everyone who made it there, especially those of you who had a consultation. It has also been a really great learning opportunity for me, helping me to understand more about who our customers are and what your interests and questions are in terms of health, beauty and nutrition.

This week, I am therefore dedicating my post to you, sharing some of the most interesting questions and common topics that I have been asked about over the past few weeks.

Are Beauty & Go Drinks High in Sugar?

sugar

One of the most commonly asked questions was about the sugar levels in our drinks. In fact this is such a hot topic at the moment, I will be devoting an entire post to it next month, explaining all you need to know about sugar. For now though, here is the shorter version!

Beauty & Go do not contain any added sugars at all, they only contain naturally occurring sugars that come from fruits. The sugars that come from fruit are not the same as the refined sugars that are added to processed foods – it is these added sugars that we need to reduce. The natural sugars found in fruit come packaged with many other nutrients including vitamins, antioxidants and fibre and are therefore beneficial to our health. Refined sugar on the other hand, is referred to as ‘empty calories’ because it provides pure energy without any nutritional benefits and consuming too much is associated with health problems.

Unfortunately, confusion and incorrect advice from some popular diet books has led to these two different types of sugar being ‘lumped’ together. This has the unfortunate consequence of scaring people away from fruit (not great at all from a nutritionist’s point of view!).

Beauty & Go drinks have been sugar reduced, so that even the level of natural fruit sugars has been lowered. This results in a lower calorie content (just 87.5 per 250ml bottle) allowing you to drink the recommended 1-3 per day without worrying about adding too many extra calories to your overall diet. Stevia, a natural calorie free sweetener sourced from the leaf of the stevia plant has been added in place of those removed fruit sugars.

In addition, Beauty & Go drinks have added fruit fibre, so they provide some of the valuable fibre you would get from whole fruits that is not usually found in juices.

(Please remember to look out for my post next month, which will look into this topic in more detail).

How does the collagen work? How is it absorbed into my skin?

colageno

Collagen is one of the main structural proteins of our skin, essential for maintaining the strength, firmness and elasticity of the skin. It is produced in the body by cells called fibroblasts, whose job is to secrete collagen as well as other important components of skin. As we age, collagen production by these fibroblasts naturally slows down, and this results in signs of ageing such as wrinkles, sagging and loss of elasticity.

The collagen in Beauty & Go works by stimulating fibroblasts to produce more of your body’s own collagen, so is exactly what is needed to counteract this natural slowing down of production as we age!

The collagen from your Beauty & Go drinks is absorbed via your digestive system, in exactly the same way as other nutrients from food, and from here it is naturally attracted towards the fibroblasts where it has its effects.

The collagen in Beauty & Go is in the form of collagen peptides, which means shorter fragments or pieces of collagen. These peptides have been shown in tests to be more easily absorbed by the body than larger, whole collagen molecules. Scientific studies have proven collagen peptides to be highly bio-available (meaning readily absorbed and able to exert a beneficial effect) and to improve skin condition and elasticity1.

watchHow long do Beauty & Go take to work?

It takes about 1 month to see the full benefits from Beauty & Go drinks, but you will gradually see and feel the improvements taking place as the month goes by. Making lasting changes to your health and skin through nutrition will always take a little time and patience. It won’t happen instantly or overnight but remember the benefits last longer when they come from within, so it is worth the investment!

For a more instant effect when you or your skin is looking tired, or if you have had a late night (or two!), the Beauty & Go Vitality drink is a great ‘morning-after’ solution. As well as the long-term benefits you get from all Beauty & Go drinks, ingredients such as guaraná and green tea will provide an instant ‘pick me up’ and anti-fatigue effect for you and your skin.

What is the difference between Beauty & Go and a juice?

BEAUTY-AND-GO-versus-juices

Beauty & Go drinks contain the natural goodness from real fruits, vegetables and plants but with so much more! I often tell people to think of them as a more of a skin supplement, because the ingredients provide benefits above and beyond those that can be obtained from normal foods.

For example the Beauty & Go Vitality drink contains as much coenzyme Q10 as you would get from eating 60 avocadoes! Our patented MacroAntioxidants cannot be obtained from normal foods at all, because they are extracted from the skin and peel of fruits, in a special process only by us! The skin and peel of fruits such as oranges and pomegranates is where the most powerful, protective antioxidants are found, but as we cannot eat these, they are usually thrown away!

In addition, Beauty & Go contain a wide range of other super-foods, herbal and plant extracts that do not form part of our usual diet. Please click in the button for more information on the ingredients.

 

 

References
1. Proksch E, Segger D, Degwert J, Schunck M, Zague V, Oesser S. Oral supplementation of specific collagen peptides has beneficial effects on human skin physiology: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Skin Pharmacol Physiol. 2014;27(1):47-55. doi: 10.1159/000351376. Epub 2013 Aug 14. PubMed PMID: 23949208.